No, it's not spelled Speckels.

January 18, 2012 at 11:30pm
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After (notice the water in the background).

After (notice the water in the background).

11:29pm
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Before.

Before.

September 6, 2011 at 10:34pm
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Bored on the bus from last weekend.

Bored on the bus from last weekend.

August 24, 2011 at 10:13pm
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I love Denver!

I love Denver!

August 23, 2011 at 9:35pm
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I think I am going blind…

I think I am going blind…

August 20, 2011 at 9:59pm
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This picture is actually taken from the bottom of a year round snowfield (taken August 20th) looking up, not from the top looking down, in the James Peak Wilderness portion of the Roosevelt National Forest.

This picture is actually taken from the bottom of a year round snowfield (taken August 20th) looking up, not from the top looking down, in the James Peak Wilderness portion of the Roosevelt National Forest.

August 13, 2011 at 11:18pm
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Flowers at Wash Park

August 1, 2011 at 3:27pm
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Summertime in Granby, Colorado.

Summertime in Granby, Colorado.

July 16, 2011 at 2:16am
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In Defense of the Movie Based on a Novel

As I walked out of the movie theater after seeing Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, or as I like to call it, HP7P2, I couldn’t help but think of all of the discrepancies between the movie and the book. No, I wasn’t annoyed. I didn’t sit through the movie thinking to myself, “Aww those bastards, Harry actually imperius-ed the guard AND the goblin, not JUST the goblin.” If anything, I thought the exact opposite: I really enjoyed, even relished in the differences between the book and the movie.

Why might you ask? Because the movie and the book are two mediums, two stories, two completely different attempts at bringing to life something that can exist only in one’s own mind (the mind of the reader and the mind of the creators of the movie). They complement each other.

For example, in the book Professor McGonagall says something to the effect of “We will seal the castle.” Harry then runs off to to badass wizard stuff and we aren’t really left with an image of what “sealing the castle” means. The movie fills this void nicely. We are left with an image of Professor McGonagall sending spells into the sky to create a barrier over Hogwarts. Movies made from novels undoubtedly have to do this sort of creating countless times. From casting to scenery to dialogue between characters creators of movies have quite a bit of work to do that the book just doesn’t provide. And forget that they have to fit a book that takes hours upon hours to read into roughly a two hour movie. I am sure it is no small task.

While there were certainly parts of the movie that could have followed the book a little better, I appreciate the little differences between the two and the creative challenges that face the makers of the movie.

Point: read the book, enjoy the movie.

July 10, 2011 at 11:31pm
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Frolfing in Bailey.

Frolfing in Bailey.